‘Good Health is One of Life’s Toughest Obstacles ~ Especially In America _ Many So-Called ‘Health Foods’ in are ‘Factory’ GMO (Over-Heated & Over Milled)-Synthetic & Cannot Arm Immune System or CNS – Modern Disease-Causing!

by facebookcomdeehinkle2 

Define Omnivore –

– an animal or person that eats food of both plant and animal origin.

BECAUSE OF MODERN GMO (Magnifies food (but make it No longer Bioavailable & Magnifies Mother Natures Survival Adaptations (Lectin & Glutens) Natural adaptions to save grain from predators

  • IF NOT REMOVED  by Soaking
  • or by using non-GMO Heritage seeds for Planting –

~ Many reasons to BAN GMO~ & BAN ‘FACTORY PROCESSES’ (UNCLEAN – Skipping Ancient steps (Soaking – Not-Over-milling or Over-Heating ~ altering (Roasting)

ABUSIVE Modern Factory GMO Factory processes have given rise to SEEK SHELTER & AVOID Toxic ALLERGIES, WEIGHT GAIN-Obesity , ORGAN Failure (BY Over-Prescribed Pharma), Age-related disease (Heart, memory, asthma, etc)

Also to Vegans & Veterans – who desire to only eat Not altered  by FACORY PROCESSES

– CLEAN FOOD ~ Terry Walters    terrywalters.net

Best-selling author, TERRY WALTERS ~ is at the forefront of the clean eatinglifestyle movement. Read more ». Subscribe to. EAT CLEAN LIVE WELL.

Clean Food · Recipes · Books · Clean Food Events

CLEAN FOOD – Terry Walters     terrywalters.net › about

Terry Walters is at the forefront of the clean eating lifestyle movement and is dedicated to sharing her knowledge and passion to eat clean and live well. Her work …

EverUp.com | EAT CLEAN LIVE WELL – Terry Walters

terrywalters.net › 2017/01 › everup-com-the-only-nutri…

Mar 28, 2016 – Pierre. What he’s saying: There is no one size fits all diet. In Clean Food, Walters recommends keeping a food journal that logs daily activities, …

How to Eat Clean! with the Clean Eating Queen, Terry Walters

partyinmyplants.com › podcast

Dec 4, 2016 – Just 1 tbsp or salt and 1.5 cups of water. And just cover them and let them sit for a week on your counter. Then just seal them up, put it in your … EAT CLEAN – LIVE WELL

Another Reason to Eat Clean!

TO ‘ARM’ THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

& CAMPAIGN For Laws to Prevent Miller’s from TAKING MORE THAT THEIR ‘PRESCRIBED AMOUNT’ OF PLANT PROTEIN

& LABELING LAWS that Disclose Inflammatory 6 ‘motor-like-oils that are Created for SHELF LIFE & are Major Contributors to the Corona Virus – WORLDWIDE ~

  • CHART OF GLOBAL PANDEMIC CORONA VIRUS ~
  • Countries and territories[a]
  • THE DEVELOPED COUNTRIES ~ LOVE WHITE FLOUR & RICE! NO PROTECTION WITH WEAKENED IMMUNE SYSTEMS!READ MORE ON THE CAUSE OT A GLOBAL PANDEMIC~
    **CONNECT THE DOTS!!
  • ANOTHER REASON TO BAN GMO FACTORY PROCESSED  FOODS TO PREVENT ANOTHER PANDEMIC  US & OTHER COUNTRIES THAT LOVE REFINED WHITE BREAD & RICE
  • LEADING THE WAY IN SPREADING VIRUS ~ (CANCER & OTHER flu will also fall by Banning GMO in America) 
  • US GMO & OVER-PROCESSED FACTORY FOOD – 3 TO 4 TIMES CORONA VIRUS CASES ~
  • Countries and territories[a]
  • Cases [OF CRONNA VIRUS ]
  • Deaths[c]
  • Recov.[d]
  • Ref.
  • GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • 614,180
  • 26,061
  • 49,857
  • [11]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • White Rice Paella  for Labors ~who work & not necessarily need brain Power
  • 174,060
  • 18,255
  • 67,504
  • [14]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • Pasta- over-milled  empty of brain food!
  • 162,488
  • 21,067
  • 37,130
  • [17]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • 132,210
  • 3,495
  • 58,112
  • [18][19]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • Croissant “ Tasty -empty of Brain food!
  • 103,573
  • 15,729
  • 28,805
  • [21][22]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • 93,873
  • 12,107
  • –
  • [24][25]
  • Non-GMO & Over-Milling & Over-Heating ~ Plant Protein for Brain CNS ~MIA
  • 82,295
  • 3,342
  • 77,816
  • [26]
  • 74,877
  • 4,683
  • 48,129
  • [32]
  • 65,111
  • 1,403
  • 4,799
  • [33][34]
  • 33,573
  • 4,440
  • 7,107
  • [35]
  • 27,419
  • 2,945
  • –
  • [37]
  • 27,063
  • 903
  • 8,235
  • [38]
  • 25,936
  • 1,174
  • 14,700
  • [39]
  • 25,262
  • 1,532
  • 14,026
  • [40][41]
  • 24,490
  • 198
  • 1,986
  • [42]
  • 17,448
  • 567
  • 347
  • [43]
  • 14,234
  • 384
  • 7,633
  • [44][45]
  • 12,200
  • 126
  • 2,309
  • [46]
  • 11,479
  • 406
  • –
  • [47]
  • 11,445
  • 1,033
  • –
  • [48]
  • 11,439
  • 377
  • 1,306
  • [49]
  • 10,591
  • 225
  • 7,616
  • [50]
  • 10,303
  • 230
  • 2,869
  • [51][52]
  • 8,100
  • 119
  • 853
  • [53]
  • 7,917
  • 92
  • 2,646
  • [59]

Help Create Awareness OF CAFO Contribution to Greenhouse Gas

** CAFO waste (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation)-Over 168 Gases are Emitted by Factory Farms by Cows being Fed GMO grain – undigestible for cows & they BELCH METHANE ~ Major Cause of ‘Global Warming’-

Ban GMO & CAFOs Go Away!

Help Create Awareness OF CAFO Contribution to Greenhouse Gas

** CAFO waste (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation)-Over 168 Gases are Emitted by Factory Farms by Cows being Fed GMO grain – undigestible for cows & they BELCH METHANE ~ Major Cause of ‘Global Warming’-

Ban GMO & CAFOs Go Away!

BUT NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT IT

– LESS BIG BUSINESS & BIG GOVERNMENT HAVE THEY WAY!

**  Leslie Stahl – Sunday Morning-exposed the Government schemes to pay the farmer (Most of the money bypasses small farmers & goes into the pocket of Big Food – LOOP HOLES-

**  Researchers are looking more closely at Abusive Factory Processes-

According to diet creator Dr. Steven Gundry, a group of proteins called lectins are wreaking havoc on our health. The former cardiac surgeon argues that by eliminating lectins (found in nightshades,  All grains and dairy (Since 90’s GMO, Soy, Corn * Alfalfa – MAGNIFIED BY GMO –  amongst other foods), you can lower inflammation, lose weight from Ingesting DEAD Factory Foods – Already processed & ready made for FAT STORAGE~

– Heat-altering or Over-Milling (for SHELF-LIFE) WISE CHOICE – However ~

Vegetarians do not eat fish, meat or poultry, but do eat eggs and dairy. Vegans also follow the no-meat rule, but also exclude animal products or by-products such as eggs, dairy and honey. In the past, eggs have had a bad reputation, as their yolks contain a lot of dietary cholesterol.

Is pasture raised better?

In it, researchers found that one pastureraised egg contains twice as much omega-3 fat, three times more vitamin D, four times more vitamin E and seven times more beta-carotene than eggs from hens raised on traditional feed. From an agricultural standpoint, pastureraised eggs are often superior too.Jul 25, 2016

Article explains difference between pasture-raised and free-range …

PastureRaised Pork is better for Body, CNS – Prefrontal Brain & Immune system ~

When pigs are raised on pasture or are WILD ~ with access to natural forage and plenty of sunshine, their meat and BRAIN HEALTHY fat is also richer in micronutrients, particularly fat-soluble vitamins E and D, as well as minerals like selenium (read more here).Sep 20, 2016

Article explains difference between pasture-raised and free-range …

Pasture raised meats contain a far higher level of vital omega-3 fatty acids than beef or pork raised in feedlots. Omega-3s help protect heart cells and other systems in the body from developing stresses that can lead to such conditions as an irregular heart beats or high blood pressure.

Know The Benefits Of Eating Pasture Raised Meat | Yankee …

Read More –

By Ruby Tandoh; photos by Riaz Phillips

16 July 2019, 5:45amShareTweetSnap

ANOTHER DIET that ‘Pays No Mind’ to the importance of non-GMO, Factory processes & (which remove the Plant protein & Omega 3)

Where is the non-GMO corn, soy or Alfalfa fed to animals in a Barn?

Pasture-raised & Heritage Soy, Corn  (we have to look abroad to Europe?)

Rachel Ama and the Trouble with Apolitical Food

WST ~ The rising vegan YouTube star treads carefully around the tangled politics of race and veganism. For her, making accessible plant-based recipes is a form of activism.

Vegan food is not a fad (THAT IS DEBATABLE)!!!

Rachel Ama is keen to stress this to me as we stand in the kitchen of her north London home, watching over a pot of simmering pasta sauce. “I want that narrative to go away,” the vegan cooking YouTuber shares, breaking jackfruit into soft, fat flakes and stirring it into the tomato sauce for her vegan ‘juna’ (jackfruit ‘tuna’) pasta. “Because in cultures all around the world people are not necessarily saying ‘this is vegan’, they’re just eating vegetables and getting on with it.”

And Rachel is right. Within Caribbean cooking, for example, a community of plant-based cooks has held fast, creating a legacy that stretches across generations. Traditionally, there’s the vegetarianism and veganism of those in the Rastafari movement following an ital diet. A new generation of health-conscious Jamaican vegans is also shaking things up in the country’s big cities. And here in the UK, young people are working to build on that heritage, staking out a place in the largely white and middle-class vegan landscapewith plant-based incarnations of the flavours their parents and grandparents used to cook.

VEGAN YOUTUBER AND COOKBOOK AUTHOR RACHEL AMA AT HOME IN NORTH LONDON, PREPARING JACKFRUIT ‘JUNA’ PASTA.

Take Peckham institution Deserted Cactus, where chef Esme Carr serves everything from fried plantain to stuffed dumplings, okra fritters and callaloo. Or influencers Craig and Shaun McAnuff, who followed up their popular Original Flava cookbook with Vegan Flava earlier this year, remixing their family favourites for today’s changing tastes. And then there is Rachel Ama, whose YouTube channel, showcasing vegan cooking inspired by her Caribbean roots, has amassed over a quarter of a million followers.

Recipes in Rachel’s book draw from her St Lucian roots, from an ackee scramble, in which the fruit’s creamy, sunny yellow flesh stands in for eggs, to jackfruit fritters (a fish-free reimagining of Grandma Pat’s signature dish). There are moments of wellness faddishness, however. Although Rachel is careful to preface health chat with reminders that it’s just her experience, she slips at times into language bordering on Goop-style silliness. “The first thing I noticed after going vegan,” she shares in one video, “is I just felt so much lighter! It’s almost like your floating a little bit higher than you were before. I’m telling you guys, it’s true.”

=

PUBLISHED LAST MONTH, ‘RACHEL AMA’S VEGAN EATS’ IS RACHEL’S FIRST COOKBOOK.

But still, it’s exciting to see a vegan cookbook freed from the tyranny of staid whiteness: the photography shows the busy shelves of Brixton’s Afro-Caribbean grocery shops, flashes of colourful batik cloth, and brown hands making great food. “When I first went vegan I would look on YouTube for inspiration, but I didn’t find anyone I could relate to,” she writes in the introduction. The fact that she now, as a black woman with locs, graces the cover of a mainstream vegan cookbook is something beautiful in itself.

There’s a need for more visibility of black vegans. Kaila Stone is a student, and London born-and-bred. Her family are Jamaican, many of them following an ital diet. “That was my earliest introduction to veganism as a child, before I really understood it,” she tells me. “But I understood enough to recognise how the diet was linked to spirituality and community.” When she became vegan as a young teenager, however, the experience was isolating. Although Kaila knew her blackness and her veganism sat in harmony, white vegans thought otherwise. “They couldn’t comprehend a black person existing without eating chicken. Those were real conversations I had with people, and I ended up internalising a lot of those reactions.”

For people of colour in majority-white spaces, it’s rare that we are to be allowed space just to be – to cook, eat, share knowledge, make whatever tastes good, for no reason other than it’s what we’re hungry for in that moment. So, it’s refreshing that Rachel Ama is, in many ways, just herself. This is the Rachel Ama who, in her YouTube videos, chats and cooks while dancing to Caribbean songs and old school hip-hop. It is the Rachel Ama who cooked me a (very tasty) vegan tuna pasta when I came round for lunch, just because it’s what she always used to eat at uni. And her book is not titled or subtitled with ‘Caribbean’ or ‘St Lucian’ – there are no claims here to being the spokesperson for an entire diverse food culture. Called simply Rachel Ama’s Vegan Eats, it is exactly what it says it is: a vegan cookbook that crystallises around one person’s food-filled life.

Vegan Mac ‘n’ Cheese with ‘Bacon Bits’ Recipe

RACHEL AMA

But this self-reflexivity, a kind of culinary selfie, has its limitations. I ask where Rachel finds communities of other black vegans. “Instagram,” she says firmly, at first, but then she falters. “I feel like you find each other and you reach out to each other… Um.” She doesn’t offer names. I mention Bryant Terry, the award-winning African-American vegan food writer who, like Rachel, sometimes offers song suggestions alongside his recipes, but Rachel hasn’t heard of him. She treads nervously around matters of race, not once in our conversation about the tangled politics of veganism saying the words ‘black’ or ‘white’.

JACKFRUIT JUNA PASTA, RACHEL’S VEGAN TAKE ON THE TUNA PASTA SHE ATE AS A STUDENT.

Rachel is loyal to her YouTube followers, for whom she tells me she wrote the book. “I say when [followers] meet me, ‘Come give me a hug, because I know I’m on the other side but we’re friends, man.’” And there are friends in the food world, like musician and chef Denai Moore, of vegan Jamaican food business Dee’s Table. “Whenever she does something, I put it straight up on my social media like, go check out Dee’s stuff!” But beyond these small circles, the sense of community seems to unravel. At points, it feels like being trapped on an Escher staircase, where a tiny circle of writers, vloggers and creatives hype each other up, and up, and up, in a closed loop of so-called influence.

Betty Vandy is a vegan chef (and cookbook enthusiast) with roots in Sierra Leone, like Rachel. Originally from Liverpool, she travels the length of the country with her vegan “African Creole soul” food business Bettylicious Cooks. For Betty, representation alone isn’t enough – it’s important that black vegans dismantle the white vegan mainframe rather than simply inserting themselves into it. To be vegan and black is, for many, a political position, inseparable from conversations about race and power. “You may look like me, but what really are you representing?” Betty asks. “Who are you standing up for?”

Of course, Rachel shouldn’t have to do the heavy lifting of talking about race, gender, pain and politics every time she shares a recipe. Too often, the pernicious expectation of people of colour in food is that we should only talk about food insofar as it relates to identity, race or belonging. Until we ask this emotional labour of white cooks and writers, the food world cannot ask black women to wade deep into their trauma just to earn a seat at the table.

But the question of solidarity is a pertinent one because, as Rachel reminded me, veganism isn’t a fad. It doesn’t belong to one time, fashion, country or person – it spreads its roots wide. Rachel is just one small, vital part of a dynamic black vegan community. She is already feeding parts of that community, with her fritters and plantain and juna pasta. That community can nourish her, too.

Where Rachel chooses to focus her energy, for now, is in making vegan food accessible to her followers, on YouTube and through her book, in ways that bring some Caribbean flavour to the mix. She knows it’s not easy for everybody. “Everyone’s living different lives, has access to different kinds of fruits and vegetables and only has X amount of time to spend in the kitchen,” she explains. But small changes can make a big difference. “That’s my activism: to give people vegan options to make that they can enjoy.”

TAGGED:MUNCHIESYOUTUBEENVIRONMENTVEGANRACEIDENTITYVEGANISMINFLUENCERRUBY TANDOHCARIBBEAN FOODRACHEL AMA

facebookcomdeehinkle2 | May 10, 2020 at 12:52 am | Categories: Uncategorized | URL: https://wp.me/p8gA0W-1ru

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