‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ by Delia Owens – A Must Read!

Some Read her novel for the Romance-

Some for the for the Murder Mystery-

I read for the poetry & to Understand how she grew so MANY MEMORY TILES!

Kya’s DNA was likely substantial – Her father said they had ‘mean’ before the Great Depression put her family in a ‘holding pattern’,

Her mother loved poetry & literature…

Her diet was Seafood (freshly caught) –

& Grits – WHOLE GRAIN & not MODERN OVER-MILLED)

(Not CAFO-GMO-(GMold)

& GREENS DAILY cooked in fatback or other pastured meats – (Brain-Healthy Lard)! (PRIOR TO CAFO-GMO Processes after WWII.

No mention of eating ‘muscle meat’ mostly used  for SEASONING greens & grits!

Occasional COKE

SUNSHINE & EXERCISE! Like the Apostles – the Miracle of Loaves & Fishes: He, some say God – Multiplied Loaves & Fishes!

Science is now showing that Omega3, Fish Protein & Whole (unaltered) Ancient Grains provide a substantial foundation for the Prefrontal Brain & CNS!

What she missed by not being born Post WWII:

Genetic Modification A bit like eating PB&J on MOLDY bread!

From ‘The Boxer’ – ‘Pocketful of Mumbles’…

‘They Hear what they want to hear – 

disregard the rest’!!

‘GMold’ MAGNIFIES THE FOOD (FEED THE WORLD)!  (Another Flavor of GENOCIDE)?

We approaching a PARADIGM SHIFT! 

Caused by Greed & All CAFO-GMOld Tasty, Synthetic, Fast, Cheap  & Nutrition-less’-  

While Genetic Modification –

Magnifies the FOOD – ‘To Feed the world’ –

The GOOD REASON!

THE REAL REASON IS PROFIT! Mega-profits from cheap ‘disease-causing’ substrates  – Formerly known as  ‘FOOD’!!

ALSO ‘MAGNIFIES’ are the ‘Seed Locks’- Celiac disease rampant!!

ALSO  MAGNIFIES the‘Lectins’ in the Peel– Bitter to ward-off Predators’(Obesity)!!

These ‘Naturally occurring ‘non-nutrients” – Ancestors removed by SOAKING in WATER (with medium) & RINSING AWAY before cooking!

CAFO-GMO ‘processing’ SKIPS this vital step & the CREATES  Disease-Causing-non-nutrients are Ground into the flour Over-Milled removing the Plant Protein)

(Whole Wheat (UNCLEAN) 

** ‘Heat Altered’ CAFO-GMO Meat & Dairy 

Modern Dairy – ‘Mass Extinction’  –

What is no longer real food: American Pizza, PASTA,  Ice Cream, hot dogs, (any CAFO-GMO MEAT OR MODERN DAIRY) Over-Milled All Purpose-less flour & all baked goods made with it 2 grams of plant protein – Disease causing!

GenocIde by Sweet Dysfunction

(Three STRIKES against Modern Dairy & things made with Modern dairy (not Pasture Raised): 

  • Contain ‘Dead Bacteria’ from Pasteurization – Replacing ‘LIVE’ Beneficial Bacteria  (digestion assistants)!
  • After 90’s –The Beginning of GMO fed to America’s Meat & Dairy sources) animals – Alfalfa, Soy or Corn – (Research is showing forms Alzheimer’s Plaques in the brain)!
  • Cortisol from ‘inhumane. stressful’ farming conditions. ‘Energy-sapping’ processed For Shelf Life! (not the ‘quality off our Lives’ (Medicare)

Plant Protein – Not altered by Heat, Over-Milling & GM0!

The Forgotten & Hidden Protein-(HIDDEN by Graft)!

Disease-Causing CAFO-GMold – UNCLEAN Processing!

The Protein  that Supports the CNS & Prefrontal Brain (the Thinking Brain!)

Unaltered whole Ancient Grains & Seafood Protein!!

God gave the Irish Whiskey (CNS solvent) so they would never rule the world!

God gave the US GMold to keep Minds dull! & Bodies to amass  & accumulate DEAD but ‘Tasty,’ Unclean, Synthetic, faux Body-only what was once named nourishment!

** Ban GMO – It is Not SAFE!

Other CAFO-GMold Processes that remove CNS Protein –

** Ban Roasting-of Raw Nuts, Seeds & Ancient Grains –

Allergy-Causing & Omega 3 changes to Inflammatory – Omega 6 (Dead ‘Body only’ food) – CANCER CAUSING – Free Radicals (INFLAMMATORY)

Simple reliable process (time proven) – Like Baptism! SOAKING & RINSING – makes ‘CLEAN’ by removing the Seed Lock & Lectins.

** Ban Over-Milled Ancient Grains (Unaltered source of Plant Protein)-

The Body is a closed system & knows how to be “VERY CREATIVE IN FINDING “STORAGE PLACES”-

** Cheap ‘HIGH PROFIT’- Especially for Western Medicine & tickets on the Medicare Bus!

Fast ‘Over-Processed ‘DISEASE-CAUSING’ Convenience’ foods – Especially…

When there is “No Room Left at the Inn” –     THE BIBLE WARNED about Gluttony…

All EXCESS of both – NATURAL As well as“man-made” (CAFO-GMO, OVER Heated or Milled) can “sap your energy” & contribute to everything from brain fog to digestive issues. 

Chronic exposure to FREE RADICALS-(toxins) produces – Cellular damage, Allergic reactions, Compromised immunity & Rapid Aging. 

Regular use of Activated Charcoal can REMOVE Unwanted FREE RADICALS & toxins from the body – Leaving MORE ENERGY – Often in minutes!

Another reason to AVOID – CAFO-GMold!!

** We can do better WITH Prevention & Reversing DISEASE (& HOMELESSNESS) armed with SCIENCE & COMPASSION! 

Instead of ‘KICKING-THE-HOMELESS Can’–‘Down-the-Road!’

HOMELESS & DISEASE WILL END – WHEN ‘GMO IS BANNED IN USA’ –

**(CAFO Will Implode) Global Warming will drastically slow – Global greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector totaled 4.7 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO₂) equivalent, up 13 percent over 1990 – When Genetic Modified was allowed in the US.

CAFO-GMO Agriculture is the third largest contributor to global emissions by sector, following the burning of fossil fuels for power and heat, and transportation.

Commercial sale of GMO (genetically modified) foods began in 1994, when Calgene first marketed its unsuccessful Flavr Savr delayed-ripening tomato.

Most food modifications have primarily focused on (CASH CROPS) in ‘high demand’ by farmers -Such as GMO soybean, GMO Alfalfa & All CORN, GMO canola, & GMO cotton.

MOST PEOPLE THINK – ‘I am (we are) not eating GMOld’ – 

However,  Since GMO ALFALFA, Corn & Soy is being fed to the animals WE EAT!   With the OBESITY at the Highest levels ever – CAFO-GMOld is making its way through the food chain in a benign but still insidious assault! 

Labels may say Non-GMO or Organic, but since there is no regulation or enforcement-Labels cannot be trusted! Verify with Google!

**The U.S. ranks as the MOST OBESE country in the world. In the average country tracked by the OECD, about one-fifth of the population is obese.

**United States (the ‘LAST STRONGHOLD’ in the World -NOT to ‘BAN’ GMO)

From 1976 to 1980, just under 1 in 7 American adults, or 15.1 percent, were

(https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus02cht.pdf)OBESE.

Now, despite people’s concerted efforts, Obesity it at its HIGHEST LEVEL EVER – with about 40 percent of U.S. adults and 18.5 percent of children   (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db288.htm), considered obese.

Choose WILD or PASTURED Sources – states by name…

The Protein Myth Debunked! Protein for Dummies!!

Conventional Bread – 

Not Our Daily Bread-only 2 grams of Protein –

The rest – ‘disease-causing’ carbs!!

Read More:

Just to Be Clear! Sprouting & Soaking- Making ‘CLEAN’ FOOD-BUT-Over Milling -4 Grams Not Enough! UNCLEAN-Not Ethical!Dee Hinkle on LinkedIn Publish date February 23, 2019

Ezekiel Bread (Sprouted) – ONLY 4 grams of ‘Plant Protein’ – Not Biblical!!

The Protein (on the back label) ‘SHOULD BE, 6 OR MORE! Making more room for Disease -Causing ‘REFINED CARBS’!

Non-GMO Sprouted BREADS WITH 6 GRAMS OF PLANT PROTEIN (Back Label)

** Dierbergs GLuten-Free Section (Freezer)!

Sprouted Sourdough Bread

Highlights: Flour-less | Sourdough

Sprouted Sourdough Bread –

**  ‘Alvarado Street Bakery’ https://lnkd.in/gQfbacU

Ingredients: Sprouted Organic Whole Wheat Berries, Filtered Water, Honey, Wheat Gluten, Cultured Wheat Starch, Yeast, Sea Salt, Sunflower Lecithin.

** ‘Silver Hills’ Sprouted Power 6 grams!

EAT WILD OR Find a Local Farmer ( always ask the specific grains fed to their animals … If it is ALFALFA, SOY OR CORN – PASS!!

It is the most comprehensive source for PASTURED meat & RAW dairy products in the United States and Canada.

Products include: Beef, Pork, Lamb, Veal, Goat, Elk, Venison, Yak, Chickens, Ducks, Rabbits, Turkeys, Eggs, RAW Milk, RAW Cheeses, Wild-Caught Salmon and more!

Eat Wild – Find Your Statewww.eatwild.com/products/

 Choose states by name…

Find a broken link, missing website, discontinued e-mail address, or disconnected phone number? 

Please E-mail our Webmasterand help us keep Eatwild up-to-date!

AlabamaAlaskaAll-Grass DairiesArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelawareDistrict of ColumbiaFarms That ShipFloridaGeorgia|HawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming|

CANADAAll-Grass DairiesFarms That ShipInternational

True Pasture-Raised Meats

Ban GMO & the CAFO (Commercial Agriculture (inhumane) Factories) – THEY WILL COLLAPSE & Save our health & THE PLANET!!

 

 

Review: ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ is a nostalgic debut novel

by Florida Huff| 2/12/19 2:35am

I grew up in the south, and some of my most vivid childhood memories took place on the sandy shores of the Atlantic or in the pristine saltwater marshes on the Carolina coast. I was always captivated by the raw beauty in these environments: sunlight bending through Spanish moss, the great arc of a blue heron in flight, hundreds of fiddler crabs scuttling across the mud flats and the gentle lapping of waves at low tide. The sheer abundance of life clustered within the marshes always astounded me. They were their own little sanctuary, sheltered from concrete high-rises and boisterous tourists, having just the right conditions to foster an entire ecosystem.

When I first read the description for “Where the Crawdads Sing” by Delia Owens, I was suffering from homesickness and desperate for a taste of my southern roots. Set in the Outer Banks of North Carolina from the 1940s through the 1960s, “Where the Crawdads Sing” checked all my boxes for the perfect winterim novel: historical fiction, a female-centered narrative and a way to satisfy my craving for home. I picked up the novel on my way to visit a friend in North Carolina, and I was immediately hooked by the emotive nature of the protagonist’s story. The lushness of Owens’ prose rendered “Where the Crawdads Sing” utterly enthralling; I couldn’t put it down.

“Where the Crawdads Sing” depicts the coming-of-age story of the “Marsh Girl,” a secluded young woman named Kya living in the marshes of Barkley Cove, North Carolina. Kya grows up with an abusive father and a mother caught between taking care of her children and pursuing a life free of violence and poverty. When Kya’s mother ventures into town dressed in her finest clothes and fails to return, Kya faces the first of many abandonments in her young life. Soon the rest of Kya’s family leaves Barkley Cove, and Kya at nine years old, illiterate and barely able to cook grits, is forced to fend for herself.

Despite all odds, resilient and resourceful Kya finds a way of life in the marsh. Mother Nature becomes her new mother: a nurturing presence, a great protector from the harsh world outside Kya’s marsh home and a tutor in lieu of formal education. At age 15, Kya falls in love with a local boy named Tate, who teaches her how to read. When Tate leaves for college, Kya finds herself abandoned again, and she retreats even further into her marsh haven. But several years later, Kya’s lover Chase Andrews, Barkley Cove’s golden boy, is found dead at the foot of the town’s water tank, and Kya can no longer keep the outside world from infringing upon the life she’s created for herself.

By far, the most outstanding quality of “Where the Crawdads Sing” is Owens’ ability to seamlessly capture the raw beauty of the Outer Banks. Although “Where the Crawdads Sing” is Owens’ first fiction novel, Owens is the author of three nonfiction books detailing her career as a wildlife scientist in Africa, and her skills in nature writing definitely transferred to this novel. I finished “Where the Crawdads Sing” feeling like I had spent a blissful few days in the marshes, utterly transported back to my childhood days of spying for herons and catching sand crabs with my bare hands.

But I was equally swept away by Kya’s story, whose rawness took my breath away at moments. I empathized with Kya’s curiosity, strength and natural intellect. I ached at her profound sadness over the loss of her family, her disillusionment with love and her inescapable identity as an outsider. I’ve read countless stories with female protagonists, but the emotional depth of Kya’s narrative stood out to me and kept me turning the pages, eager to delve deeper into her story.

“Where the Crawdad Sings” emphasizes the importance of human connection, as Kya’s personal relationships throughout the novel take on a greater weight due to the extent of her isolation. I found Kya’s familial relationships most compelling; although they are gut-wrenching, these relationships authentically portray the devastating and lingering effects of abuse, poverty and neglect. In contrast, the love story between Kya and Tate is timeless and sweet. Although their relationship reads like a young adult romance at times, it’s age-appropriate for the teenage characters, and the patience and eagerness with which Tate teaches Kya how to read gives their connection a greater depth.

The novel alternates timelines throughout the majority of the novel, switching from Kya’s childhood in the 1940s and 1950s to the investigation of Chase Andrews’ murder in 1969. I wasn’t initially very drawn to the murder mystery narrative in the novel, as I was impatient to return to Kya’s story. Overall, I don’t think the murder storyline in “Where the Crawdads Sing” was as well-executed as it could have been; the detectives were bland, the investigation was slow to pick up and this section couldn’t measure up to the vivacity of the rest of the novel. However, Owens does an excellent job of building tension throughout Kya’s trial, and by the reading of the verdict my heart was beating out of my chest. The trial reconciles Kya’s reputation as a feral marsh-dweller with the reserved and intellectual version of Kya readers have come to know, tying in Kya’s coming-of-age story with the novel’s salacious murder mystery.

“Where the Crawdads Sing” drew me in with its promise to nurture my nostalgia for home, and the novel most certainly delivered on that promise. But by the end of the novel, Kya’s story touched me just as much as Owens’ ode to the marshes. The novel is immersive on all fronts: a fascinating story about love, loss and survival, an authentic depiction of the intricacies of rural Southern life and a homage to the uncontainable beauty of the Outer Banks.

Review: ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ is a nostalgic debut novel

by Florida Huff | 2/12/19 2:35am

I grew up in the south, and some of my most vivid childhood memories took place on the sandy shores of the Atlantic or in the pristine saltwater marshes on the Carolina coast. I was always captivated by the raw beauty in these environments: sunlight bending through Spanish moss, the great arc of a blue heron in flight, hundreds of fiddler crabs scuttling across the mud flats and the gentle lapping of waves at low tide. The sheer abundance of life clustered within the marshes always astounded me. They were their own little sanctuary, sheltered from concrete high-rises and boisterous tourists, having just the right conditions to foster an entire ecosystem.

When I first read the description for “Where the Crawdads Sing” by Delia Owens, I was suffering from homesickness and desperate for a taste of my southern roots. Set in the Outer Banks of North Carolina from the 1940s through the 1960s, “Where the Crawdads Sing” checked all my boxes for the perfect winterim novel: historical fiction, a female-centered narrative and a way to satisfy my craving for home. I picked up the novel on my way to visit a friend in North Carolina, and I was immediately hooked by the emotive nature of the protagonist’s story. The lushness of Owens’ prose rendered “Where the Crawdads Sing” utterly enthralling; I couldn’t put it down.

“Where the Crawdads Sing” depicts the coming-of-age story of the “Marsh Girl,” a secluded young woman named Kya living in the marshes of Barkley Cove, North Carolina. Kya grows up with an abusive father and a mother caught between taking care of her children and pursuing a life free of violence and poverty. When Kya’s mother ventures into town dressed in her finest clothes and fails to return, Kya faces the first of many abandonments in her young life. Soon the rest of Kya’s family leaves Barkley Cove, and Kya at nine years old, illiterate and barely able to cook grits, is forced to fend for herself.

Despite all odds, resilient and resourceful Kya finds a way of life in the marsh. Mother Nature becomes her new mother: a nurturing presence, a great protector from the harsh world outside Kya’s marsh home and a tutor in lieu of formal education. At age 15, Kya falls in love with a local boy named Tate, who teaches her how to read. When Tate leaves for college, Kya finds herself abandoned again, and she retreats even further into her marsh haven. But several years later, Kya’s lover Chase Andrews, Barkley Cove’s golden boy, is found dead at the foot of the town’s water tank, and Kya can no longer keep the outside world from infringing upon the life she’s created for herself.

By far, the most outstanding quality of “Where the Crawdads Sing” is Owens’ ability to seamlessly capture the raw beauty of the Outer Banks. Although “Where the Crawdads Sing” is Owens’ first fiction novel, Owens is the author of three nonfiction books detailing her career as a wildlife scientist in Africa, and her skills in nature writing definitely transferred to this novel. I finished “Where the Crawdads Sing” feeling like I had spent a blissful few days in the marshes, utterly transported back to my childhood days of spying for herons and catching sand crabs with my bare hands.

But I was equally swept away by Kya’s story, whose rawness took my breath away at moments. I empathized with Kya’s curiosity, strength and natural intellect. I ached at her profound sadness over the loss of her family, her disillusionment with love and her inescapable identity as an outsider. I’ve read countless stories with female protagonists, but the emotional depth of Kya’s narrative stood out to me and kept me turning the pages, eager to delve deeper into her story.

“Where the Crawdad Sings” emphasizes the importance of human connection, as Kya’s personal relationships throughout the novel take on a greater weight due to the extent of her isolation. I found Kya’s familial relationships most compelling; although they are gut-wrenching, these relationships authentically portray the devastating and lingering effects of abuse, poverty and neglect. In contrast, the love story between Kya and Tate is timeless and sweet. Although their relationship reads like a young adult romance at times, it’s age-appropriate for the teenage characters, and the patience and eagerness with which Tate teaches Kya how to read gives their connection a greater depth.

The novel alternates timelines throughout the majority of the novel, switching from Kya’s childhood in the 1940s and 1950s to the investigation of Chase Andrews’ murder in 1969. I wasn’t initially very drawn to the murder mystery narrative in the novel, as I was impatient to return to Kya’s story. Overall, I don’t think the murder storyline in “Where the Crawdads Sing” was as well-executed as it could have been; the detectives were bland, the investigation was slow to pick up and this section couldn’t measure up to the vivacity of the rest of the novel. However, Owens does an excellent job of building tension throughout Kya’s trial, and by the reading of the verdict my heart was beating out of my chest. The trial reconciles Kya’s reputation as a feral marsh-dweller with the reserved and intellectual version of Kya readers have come to know, tying in Kya’s coming-of-age story with the novel’s salacious murder mystery.

“Where the Crawdads Sing” drew me in with its promise to nurture my nostalgia for home, and the novel most certainly delivered on that promise. But by the end of the novel, Kya’s story touched me just as much as Owens’ ode to the marshes. The novel is immersive on all fronts: a fascinating story about love, loss and survival, an authentic depiction of the intricacies of rural Southern life and a homage to the uncontainable beauty of the Outer Banks.

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